Author Archives: Star Bright Books

A Guide to Sharing

Sharing is a fundamental social skill that is developed in childhood and lasts long into our lives. Not every child will have the same inclination to share, and that’s alright! No matter your child’s disposition, sharing can be taught. But what does healthy sharing look like? Here are some useful tips for helping children learn to share. 

Image from Show Me How To Be a Friend, by J.A. Barnes. Available on our website.

Show Respect and Empathy

At the root of sharing is respect. One must respect another person’s feelings, space, and belongings. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, at around three-and-a-half, children begin to understand the concept of sharing. (The groundwork for teaching children about sharing can be laid for children as young as two.) 

 

Developmentally, toddlers process their own wants and needs ahead of the wants and needs of others. This often makes sharing a strenuous and anxiety-inducing free-for-all as no one wants to be left out or left behind. Empathize with your child and talk to them about being conscious of other people’s feelings to ensure everyone has a good time. 

 

Model Positive Behaviors

One way children learn is through examples: watching your behaviors will set a foundation for the way they interact with others. Demonstrate effective, respectful communication for your child. For example, to your partner or parent, say, “Of course you can borrow my big cooking dish! Could you please return it to me by Tuesday?” Firsthand examples of polite communication as both a borrower and lender will underscore the importance of respect.

 

When you borrow an item from a friend or loved one, make sure to return it better than you found it: wash it, for example. And always say thank you! 

 

By modeling positive behaviors, you will inspire your child’s own actions. Let your little copycat take note of the way you navigate lending to and borrowing from your partner, parents, neighbors, friends, etc. They will see it is nothing to worry over! 

 

Establish Rules and Boundaries

Ground rules will make the process of sharing feel not so scary. Helping children feel secure in sharing situations will give them comfort in being both a borrower and a lender. Create a plan if there is a forthcoming playdate and your child doesn’t like to share a certain toy. Set the toy aside before the playdate and talk with your child about letting a friend take a turn with the toy. 

Image from Show Me How To Be a Friend, by J.A. Barnes. Available on our website.

Sharing is also an early form of establishing boundaries. Let your child know they are allowed to set “terms” on how they share. If your child is resistant to lending a sibling or peer their favorite teddy, show them it is okay to offer an alternative option. For instance, your child might say, “This stuffed animal is my favorite. Would you be okay with this one?” If the alternative is not desired, your child’s next step can be to say, “Okay, but I’d like to have my stuffed animal back in ten minutes [or a time they feel comfortable with].” Letting your child know that time limits and other ground rules are okay for sharing will help ease their anxieties; it will eventually become second nature.

 

When children feel anxious about sharing they may use mean words or brash actions, such as grabbing or bartering. Intervene immediately if you observe these behaviors in your child’s interactions with siblings or peers. Take a mindful moment with them to just breathe, resettle, and talk about the benefits of sharing with others. 

 

Consume Good Content

Reading and consuming content that illustrates good sharing is another vital step in fostering this lifelong skill. At this age, looking to literary role models is a good step in presenting the idea of sharing to your little one! When you notice an example of good sharing in a film or TV show, point it out to your child. Having onscreen role models and strong media examples of sharing will give your child confidence in their own sharing experiences.

Image from Show Me How To Be a Friend, by J.A. Barnes. Available on our website.

Sharing is a form of love: we share with others in order to continue fostering genuine connections. Your child will benefit from good sharing skills, now and in the future.

A Guide to Supporting Your Child Through Put-Downs

You know that sinking feeling in your stomach when mean words have been hurled at you. You just stand there, face bright red, palms wet. Put-downs, or unkind remarks about a person’s physical appearance or demeanor, are an all too common and all too unfortunate form of intimidation and bullying in school. They differ from other forms of bullying, which can be motivated by racial, religious, or other prejudices. How can you help your child navigate these mean-spirited comments they will inevitably face? 

From Mama’s Right Here, (illustrated by Estelle Corke).

First, create a space where your child can safely share the events of their day. This can be on the drive home from school, over dinner, before bedtime, or any time that fits into your schedules. Make sure your child knows you are interested and invested in their daily activities— what they learned, who they played with, etc. By establishing a routine of sharing early in your child’s life, they are more likely to come to you when negative experiences occur. 

 

Once your child has shared a situation with you, gauge the level of extremity. Take time to absorb and process all the information before entering protection mode. What happened? Who was the other party? What was the intention? How do all these things affect your child and their physical, mental, and emotional wellbeing? 

 

As a parent, it is easy to feel defensive and quickly react when your child is the subject of bullying. But by first soaking in all the facts, you will have a better grip over what will best benefit your child. Your child will also appreciate a calm handle on the situation and feel more comfortable opening up to you.

 

Once you have gauged the situation, address it with your child. Explain what put-downs are and how they can impact one’s thoughts and feelings. Put-downs can be thoughtless comments, sometimes perpetuated by your child’s friends or classmates. Elementary-aged children are learning what is and isn’t okay to say, meaning sometimes they may say something inappropriate at the cost of another’s feelings. 

From Mama’s Right Here, (illustrated by Estelle Corke).

Tailor your conversation to the incident. Be sure to bolster your child’s confidence by combatting the comment(s): your child looks to you as a beacon of both fact and reassurance. They trust your word. If you tell them they are beautiful, they will believe it; if you tell them they’re smart, they will believe it. Counter the put-down, while acknowledging and validating the hurtful impact. 

 

A major point to emphasize is that “getting even” is never the answer. A meaner comment is not an appropriate response. There is a balance between standing up for oneself and perpetuating negativity—which could prompt your child getting in trouble.

 

Tell your child that if they hear another child being subjected to put-downs, find a way to support their peer. Inviting their classmate to play, sitting with them at lunch, or complimenting the trait that was just made fun of are all good ways to combat put-downs. Helping others will help fuel your own child’s internal processing with put-downs. 

 

Unfortunately, we can’t be with our children all the time to guard them from the perils of early childhood bullying. However, we can address the issues they may face early on, and give them the tools they need to understand, verbalize, and process their feelings. 

An Ode to The Spooky Season: Ways to Celebrate Autumn

Boo! ’Tis the season for frights and autumnal festivities! With the new season comes a bevy of fun things you and your kid can do to celebrate the changing leaves and spookiest time of year. Below are some of our safe seasonal favorites. 

 

A staple of the fall holiday season is, of course, pumpkin-carving. Your child will get a kick out of selecting a pumpkin from a local pumpkin patch, while supporting local farmers and growers. The pumpkin patch is also an ideal autumn photo backdrop. Several markets and stores also carry pumpkins while in season, so your child can still discover the thrill of finding the perfect one! 

 

Once you’ve got a pumpkin, head home to start carving! Make sure to lay down some paper towels or newspaper wherever you plan to carve—it can be messy! Help your child pick out the right design. Afterward you can begin to carve the pumpkin.. Take off the top and gut it. You can either compost the guts or pull out the seeds and roast them for a snack. 

 

Time to draw and carve out the design! Once you’ve finished, choose a candle for the inside of the pumpkin. If you use a real candle, place the jack-o-lantern somewhere in your view. When using a battery-operated candle, allow your child to pick a fun spot on the front stoop or somewhere inside. Your child will love how magical the pumpkin looks when the lit candle brings it to life. 

 

Excerpt from Spook the Halloween Cat.

For families outside of urban areas, apple-picking is another holiday classic. It can be a sweet and healthy treat for your kids. Apple cider, apple pie, apple strudel, and apple cider donuts are all traditionally found at an apple orchard. Some orchards offer hay rides into the fields. You and your child can fill a basket of apples together! 

 

As Halloween approaches, you can also brainstorm homemade costumes for your child. A ghost, a witch, a robot, among others, are classic choices. Making costumes instead of buying them helps repurpose items from your home and gives your child a chance to get creative. Make it a fun project you achieve together! Identify household items that can be repurposed. Cardboard boxes can become a robot body. With a flannel shirt, straw hat, overalls, and a quick make-up job your kid is a scarecrow! An all-black outfit, paper ears, and a ball of yarn will turn your child into a cat. The possibilities are as limitless as your child’s imagination! Encourage them and see where their mind takes them. While you’re at it, make yourself a matching costume! 

 

Excerpt from Spook the Halloween Cat, available on the Star Bright Books website.

 

Finish off the season with a kid-friendly Halloween movie or two. Scary movies are a staple of the season, but oftentimes inappropriate for young audiences. Luckily, there are plenty of age-sensitive movies and TV shows with Halloween and autumn themes. Check out our list of suggestions below!

 

Beetlejuice (1988) 

Caspar (1995) 

Coraline (2009) 

Halloweentown (1998) 

Hocus Pocus (1993) 

Igor (2008) 

It’s The Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown (1966) 

Monster House (2006) 

Over the Garden Wall (2014) 

Paranorman (2012) 

Scooby Doo! and The Goblin King (2008) 

Scooby Doo! and the Witch’s Ghost (1999) 

The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) 

 

We hope these activities help you and your child make the most of this exciting and spooky season. Whether it’s getting out and about in the autumn foliage or staying inside with a Halloween book, hot cocoa, and the jack-o-lanterns all lit, there are many ways to appreciate this special time of year and special time in your child’s life.

Checking in on Your Child’s Mental Health and Academic Motivation!

As in-person schooling marches on, and the school year carries our children to greater heights, now is a good time to check in on your little learner! Over the past two years, in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, children have been dealt a hard hand: the COVID-19 virus itself, less time with friends, and a year (or more) of missing classroom time. With many schools reopening, children may have some difficulty readjusting to in-person learning. 

 

Less social interactions and more time at home may cause difficulty in resuming in-person classes with the same standard of mental presence and effort as prior to the pandemic. Checking in with your child is the best way to assess their motivation and mental health levels and offer unwavering support. 

 

First, take note of your child’s behavior. What have you noticed since the school year started? Is your child happy with their teacher and peers? How do they talk about their assignments and course load? Answering these questions can be a good indicator of where your child stands on their academic track. 

 

Some dissatisfaction is normal. Expressing excitement about classes but lackluster enthusiasm over a teacher is also a typical response. But if it seems like your child is uninterested in any aspect of school, they are likely struggling to readapt to a full-time, in-person school schedule. 

 

Once you’ve gauged your child’s motivation level, talk with them about the new normal. Share and empathize with them over the tasks you both face on a daily basis. Help them realize it’s okay to feel upset, confused, and even question things. Some disconnection is okay. COVID-19 has changed the way children see life—for better and worse. 

 

It is also important for children to understand and rationalize why we do the things we do. Explain the benefits of school, as well as how work helps you support the family. Doing so will help avoid confusion and ease the separation anxiety some children may experience.

 

“Parent support – now open for registration” by BC Gov Photos is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Help your child find a routine that fits. Perhaps they need to come home and immediately complete their homework. Or, they might benefit from a snack, some TV, and a quick nap before homework and dinner. With siblings, commit to helping each child figure it out individually. Most importantly, let them know they aren’t alone. 

 

Find small rewards that your kid will want to work for! Incentives might include a milkshake on Fridays after school, seeing a movie of their choice for good marks, or treating them to a toy at the end of each month for completing their assignments. Teaching a child healthy incentives is a lifelong lesson they’ll carry with them from schooling to a career. (Adults use incentives all the time: coffee or tea to lure ourselves out of bed, a favorite panini on our lunch break, etc.)

 

Children’s mental health has been severely impacted by the pandemic. Adults can help children balance and ground themselves as they reacquaint with in-person reality. Above all, our children need support and love during this transitional time.

How to Build a Diverse Classroom Library

Most educators understand that to help students thrive, children’s books need to reflect and uplift a child’s own identity. This can be accomplished when students have access to diverse and inclusive children’s literature, but challenges exist in both the lack of diverse children’s books on the market and limited access to funding for teachers to acquire books for their classrooms. Here is a guide on how you can overcome these challenges to make your classroom library one in which all of your students can see themselves in the pages of a book.

From Layla’s Head Scarf by Miriam Cohen, illustrated by Ronald Himler

Evaluate the Books You Have

 

Before you make any changes to your classroom library, it is important to evaluate the content and quality of the books you already have.

 

As you start to evaluate and expand your library, work with school administration to prepare for potential complaints, opposition, or censorship. Ask your school board to develop and implement policies in support of inclusive written material and clear intellectual and academic freedom statements, as well as measures to handle opposition. These policies should include a formal complaint process and indicate possible reasons for exclusion of written material.

 

Make a list of topics you want your classroom library to cover. A diverse library will include books written by or about the experience of people including (but not limited to):

  • LGBTQIA+ individuals
  • Indigenous people and people of color
  • People with disabilities
  • Families with varying socioeconomic experiences
  • Ethnic, cultural, and religious minorities

Next, clear your classroom library’s bookshelves or bins. Label the empty shelves/containers with the topics you’ve identified. Then, sort your current books into these categories, based on content and/or author demographics. Permanently remove books from your library that work against inclusion; for example, books that reinforce stereotypes or books that promote offensive depictions or descriptions.

 

Identify the types of books that are missing from your collection, based on which shelves are sparse, empty, or not varied. Remember that while it is important for children to read about racism, discrimination, and marginalization, it is essential for children to see themselves thrive. As Dorian Smith-Garcia notes, “When you’re picking stories with Black lead characters, it’s important to choose diverse plots. Not everything needs to focus on slavery, racism, and inequality all the time—the Black experience is not a limited one!”

From Layla’s Head Scarf by Miriam Cohen, illustrated by Ronald Himler

Expand Your Classroom Library

 

Now that you have a better understanding of the books already in your classroom, expand your library by researching which books will fill the gaps in your collection and figuring out how to fund and acquire those books.

 

Research books that cover the topics that are missing from your current collection. You will be able to find expert help from a librarian, or you can consult online lists of books with diverse subjects from reputable sources, such as We Need Diverse Books and the American Library Association “Best of” lists. Your students might also be able to provide great recommendations!

 

Obtain funding to purchase new books. Since PTA and classroom funds are often limited, consider applying for grants through the American Library Association. Teachers in the US can receive free diverse children’s and young adult books through the Multicultural Children’s Book Day Diverse Books for Classrooms Program. If you teach in a low-income school, there are free diverse books available through We Need Diverse Books in the Classroom.

 

You can also solicit the support of your community by starting a crowdfunding campaign through organizations like PledgeCents, Teachers Pay Teachers, or Adopt A Classroom. Collaborating with other teachers, working with a local librarian, or checking with your school administration can help you to identify additional funding sources.

 

Acquire the books on your list. A great way to use funds efficiently is by shopping at public library sales, secondhand stores, or “budget” book websites. Consider asking your local indie bookstore for discounts or donations. If your funds are very limited, harness the power of social media (especially Twitter and Instagram). Many children’s book authors and bloggers host book giveaways with hashtags like #FreeBooks, #BookGiveaway, and #KidsNeedFreeBooks.

 

Finally, integrate the new books into your classroom. Don’t just put your new books on the shelf! Having a “featured read” section can highlight a new book for your students. You can also prompt interest by reading books aloud in class or integrating them into your curriculum. Encourage student ownership in caring for the books by assigning a student “librarian of the day” to organize the library. This ownership will help assure your inclusive collection lasts for many school years to come.

From Layla’s Head Scarf by Miriam Cohen, illustrated by Ronald Himler

Learn to Fly: A Guide to Traveling with Kids

From Comings and Goings by Anna and Manos Kontoleon

Jet-setting is the fastest way to connect with places and people around the world. Everyday, thousands of flights carry people to far-away destinations. For many, it can be a daunting and anxiety-inducing experience. This is especially true for children on their first flight.

 

With travel restrictions loosening and travel becoming more possible, you and your child may have an upcoming flight. Here are some ways to set a good and healthy precedent and ease any plane anxiety your child may feel.

 

First, demystify the travel process with your kid. Talk to them about your destination and how to get there: you’ll need to pack, get to the airport on time, pass through TSA, and board the airplane. Walk them through each step so they aren’t left to wonder what the travel process will look like. It may also relax your child to know the steps you will take to ensure a smooth flight.

From Comings and Goings by Anna and Manos Kontoleon

You may want to curate the media your child consumes in the months prior to the flight. Steer clear of media that depicts planes in peril; it may frighten your child and plant a seed of fear. This is an easy precaution that will benefit you and your child before the flight.

 

Once you’ve set a good precedent before the flight, it’s time to fill the space between destinations with activities. Books are excellent in moments like this (and anytime!). Coloring books are great for stimulating a child’s imagination and preventing boredom. Most modern airplanes are equipped with TV monitors on the back of every seat. Be sure to bring headphones with wire cables, as the monitors are not Bluetooth-compatible. On shorter plane rides movies are only available to fill a portion of the in-flight entertainment.

 

For many, even adults, experiencing turbulence can induce a lot of anxiety. It can be especially upsetting for children. It will help your child to have something to do, and hold onto, if the plane experiences turbulence. They can distract themselves with a book, coloring book, or a stuffed animal. Explain to your child that turbulence is a normal occurrence and should not be feared. Talking them through the turbulence can also be a good way to ease their worries.

 

Taking off and landing are much easier when chewing gum. It will keep your ears from feeling too pressurized. For your mini-traveler, this can also help ease the rush and discomfort during the takeoff and landing.

 

If you can choose the flight time, see if a red-eye flight matches your child’s sleeping habits. It may help them adjust easier to different time zones—and they can sleep during the flight. If you depart in the evening, hopefully they’ll be so exhausted they sleep through the night. This may be the best option for children who have a lot of anxiety.

 

For kids, flying may seem daunting and wild. They might be equal parts intrigued and nervous. You can ease their concerns before arriving at the airport and during takeoff by maintaining a casual manner. Keeping your own travel stress under control will help your child understand and accept plane travel as a normal and easy way to get from place to place. It’s a chance for you and your child to enjoy time together with a book or a movie—and it’s an adventure!

From Comings and Goings by Anna and Manos Kontoleon

Artist Spotlight: Anna Kontoleon and Manos Kontoleon

Welcome to our Artist Spotlight section! Today, we talk with Anna Kontoleon and Manos Kontoleon, a daughter-father duo from Greece and authors of the forthcoming book Comings and Goings. Anna and Manos share their inspirations for the story, how the collaborative writing process took hold, fun travel experiences, and favorite memories during family trips.

 

Anna Kontoleon

Star Bright Books (SBB): What inspired you to collaborate with your father?

 

Anna Kontoleon (Anna): On one of my visits as a writer to a primary school in Chania of Crete, where I live, a young student asked me if I had ever written a book with my father. This question surprised me, realizing that I had never considered this possibility, though I grew up with his stories and I was certainly inspired by him to become a writer myself. So, I answered “no” to the young student, but I kept the idea in a corner of my mind. However, I did not want to collaborate with my father in a book, just because it would be a good idea to do it. I needed a good project that would justify our “co-existence” in the same book.

 

When I later had the idea of Comings and Goings I knew immediately that it was the right opportunity to do it.

 

Manos Kontoleon

SBB: How did it feel to write a book with your daughter?

 

Manos Kontoleon (Manos): The truth is that I had never considered the possibility of writing a book with my daughter. Maybe I should have, however, since Anna always used to be the first reader of my manuscripts and her subtle commentaries were often substantial in defining the last version of my stories. Therefore, when she proposed to me to collaborate in writing together a story inspired by the experiences of our own lives, I was delighted. Having confidence in her vision, I not only accepted her proposal, but I also let her [take] the initiative to develop the storyline and guide me through the whole process.

 

 

SBB: How was the collaborative writing process for Comings and Goings?

 

Anna and Manos: The funny thing is that this book was made in “social distance” far before the social distancing period imposed by the pandemic virus. We all worked remotely: Manos from Athens, Anna from Crete, Fotini Tikkou—who did the illustrations—from Denmark where she lived at the time. We never met [in person] during the writing process and the editing of the book. Thanks to technology this has become possible.

 

As for our collaboration in the writing process, it may not be obvious, but each one of us worked on different parts. Anna had the parts of Alex in a country of Northen Europe, Manos the parts of the relatives in a country of Southern Europe, who are waiting for him and preparing for his longed-for visit. Each of us worked freely and added our own point of view and temperament to the story, without much interference from the other, although of course we had some creative discussions at the editing process.

 

 

SBB: What inspired you to choose the theme for Comings and Goings?

 

Manos: I very often share my personal experiences with the characters of my books. This happened in this story as well. I consented to write the parts of the different members of Alex’s family in his home country, since, you see, Anna kept for her the easy part of the narration of just one main character, the protagonist young Alex and she “charged” me with the parts of seven different persons! (laughing) So, I had to “direct” the preparations of all these people for the visit of their beloved young grandchild, nephew, and cousin. It was expected that I would draw on my own experiences as the grandfather of Anna’s son to talk about my worries and feelings, but I had to get in my other characters’ skin in order to be able to speak for their own feelings and worries as well.

 

 

SBB: Do you identify with any of the book’s characters?

 

Anna: The easy answer would be that I identify with the mother of Alex, which I do of course, but not more than the obvious fact that I am a mother too.

 

I would say that I may identify more with Alex. You know, my personal belief is that the young child we once have been keeps living inside us our whole lives and sometimes takes control of our behavior or our thoughts. And when this child is whispering in our ears, we choose to write children stories.

 

As a child, I traveled a lot on my own without my parents. I think what resurfaces finally in that story is my anticipation of these trips I did on my own, along with the stress before each one of them. Every new step for a child, every change or transition, even a desired one, comes along with intense stress and agony. Because this is how we move forward in life.

 

 

SBB: Were there any particular memories that resurfaced while writing Comings and Goings?

 

Anna and Manos: The story is of course inspired by our personal experiences: the fact that we live far away from each other—well maybe not so far away as we live in the same country, but we still need to travel by airplane or ship to meet since Crete is an island. [Also,] the fact that Anna’s son is always looking forward to visiting his grandparents for the summer holidays, especially at this time when traveling has been for so long forbidden, the preparations before each trip, the waiting and the anticipation of each reunion, the surprise and the joy such a reunion brings. All these personal memories resurface in our history.

 

 

SBB: How do you feel the illustrations represent the anxiety and thrill of traveling?

 

Anna and Manos: We think that the double motif the illustrations use in each [spread] to show what happens at the exact same time in the two different countries, the expressions of doubt, anticipation and anxiety of the characters, the focus on several details and objects that have to do with traveling, and a sense of movement that exists in every page, together with the secret hints to help the child identify where the action takes place (airplane taking off and landing and the compass) and put in order the chaos that precedes each trip, represent very well the anxiety and thrill of traveling.

 

 

SBB: What are some of the best family trips you’ve taken together?

 

Anna and Manos: In the distant past we did some marvelous trips as a family to many different Greek islands. It was a careless and wealthy period in our country’s history and we keep some very nice memories from that time. In recent years, we traveled mostly to meet each other, which is always wonderful, but doesn’t include the joy of discovering a new town or country.

 

We definitely reserve a special place in our hearts to the travel we did last year in London. Exactly one month before the pandemic wave forced a worldwide lockdown, we feel we had a last marvelous chance to explore the English capital as we used to know it.

 

We don’t know when and if we’ll be able to travel abroad again together, in what conditions and [under] what specific restrictions. Traveling tends to be complicated these days. But maybe one day we’ll travel together to the US. We won’t give up on dreaming.

 

 

SBB: Besides writing, what do you enjoy doing in your spare time?

 

Anna and Manos: Anna enjoys writing songs on her guitar and singing, spending quality time with her son, walking and exploring new paths, and would wish to have the time to read more.

 

Manos enjoys reading books (he actually has a tremendous library at home with bookselves almost everywhere), and he is writing book presentations of his own impressions as an eager reader in several book magazines, sites, and portals. And he is really active writing for his two blogs.

 

 

SBB: Do you have plans for any future collaborations?

 

Anna and Manos: We’re actually considering a sequel of Comings and Goings where we’ll have the chance to show how Alex spends his fabulous holidays with his relatives, while dealing with his homesickness. And at the same time how his parents, who are left behind in the North, deal with his absence, feeling a mixture of carelessness and emptiness at the same time. The story should end with a surprise reunion.

Comings and Goings by Anna Kontoleon and Manos Kontoleon

How to Talk to Children about Climate Change

Climate change is a challenging topic for children, as it often involves scientific facts that can be difficult to understand. Related worldly issues—extreme weather, food shortages, or even pandemics—can be alarming or fear-inducing to discuss. Parents and caregivers may find it daunting to decide how and when to talk with their children about climate change.

 

As with other complex topics like racism, body autonomy, or alcohol use, conversations you have with your child about climate change should start early, be ongoing, and change based on your child’s developmental level. Here are some techniques you can use to introduce and build on conversations about climate change as your child grows.

 

Toddlers: Build a Love for Nature

Spend time outside with your toddler to help them cultivate respect for nature. Prioritizing outdoor play is increasingly important for children’s mental and physical health, but it also helps toddlers experience a sense of wonder at the beauty of nature. A toddler may not have the developmental capacity to understand the climate crisis, but their love for the environment will be foundational in caring about how they impact the earth when they’re older.

From Let’s Play Outside by Pat Rumbaugh, photographs by Daniel Nakamura

Preschool and Kindergarten: Nurture a Sense of Responsibility for the Planet

Give your preschool or kindergarten-aged child ways to nurture nature. Houseplants wither when we don’t feed them; gardens wilt if we don’t water them. Children can understand these cause-and-effect relationships at a very early age; by taking on responsibilities like watering and feeding indoor or outdoor plants, youngsters can begin to see how people impact the planet. These chores are also opportunities to discuss our larger responsibility to care for nature.

 

Elementary School: Make Real-Life Connections and Share the Science

Beginning in first grade, have more direct conversations about climate change with your child. While climate change is a global issue, it is important to show children in this age group how it impacts them personally. Ask your child how the weather affects them—how sunny days make them feel or how rainy days make it hard to play outside. Then, compare the weather today to the weather fifty or one hundred years ago. Explain that while weather variation is normal, humans cause expected weather conditions to change in an unexpected way.

 

Children in upper elementary school may also want more detailed explanations, like the difference between weather and climate, or the science behind the greenhouse effect. NASA Climate Kids has basic explanations, interesting visuals, and engaging videos to help.

 

Teenagers: Talk about Climate Inequity

With your teenager, talk about how the climate crisis reinforces inequalities—the ways in which poor or marginalized people are more harshly impacted by extreme weather. These issues naturally fit with conversations you have with your teenager about racial and socioeconomic inequity. Here are two examples of how climate change and inequity are connected:

 

When severe weather strikes a high-income country or community, people and governments have the resources to rebuild cities and homes. However, low-income countries and communities lack resources to deal with the major impacts. Climate change means low-income countries are more often impacted by natural disasters.

 

Recent heatwaves and drought are associated with increases in wheat prices. In wealthy countries, this may mean slightly higher prices at the grocery store; in lower-income places around the globe, climate change means that food has become scarce or completely unaffordable, resulting in widespread civil unrest.

From A Circle of Friends by Giora Carmi

All Ages: Focus on Making a Difference

Details about the climate crisis may be overwhelming for children (and adults). It can be reassuring for a child to hear that there are many people working together to solve the problems. Another way to combat fear is to focus on action: there are many ways to help! Below are a few options for you and your child to get involved.

 

Live Sustainably

Sustainable Living Tips from Conservation International: This list includes over seventy ways you and your child can live more sustainably. Some of these actions may not seem like much, but together, we can all make a big difference.

 

Conserve the Environment

Youth Conservation Corps: Youth ages fifteen to eighteen can apply to participate in regional environmental conservation projects like maintaining nature trails, cleaning up campgrounds, improving wildlife habitats, restoring streams, and more.

 

Advocate for the Planet

Become a member of YOUNGO: YOUNGO, the official youth constituency of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), is a network of youth organizations from all over the world. Their common goal is to mobilize youth to address the climate crisis.

The Practical Benefits of Writing Letters

Image from Comings and Goings by Anna and Manos Kontoleon, illustrated by Fotini Tikkou (Available August 30)

In this day and age, the art of proper letter writing is a fast-dying practice. Although mail services are as quick and efficient as ever, technology’s role in replacing our immediate communication practices can make putting pen to paper feel outdated.

 

However, there are numerous practical benefits for children to pick up letter writing—especially with so much recent at-home schooling. Letter writing helps children develop lifelong skills, such as patience, penmanship, sentence-building, and maintaining relationships with family and friends.

 

First, help your child identify a good letter recipient. Writing letters is a great way to bridge generational gaps. Grandparents, great aunts and uncles, and other elderly people may prefer letters to text messages or emails, so this is an easy and fun way to keep in contact—and letters are sure to be on display on the fridge for years to come! One of your child’s pals or a friendly neighbor are also good options. The recipient should be someone who you think will be inclined to respond.

 

Writing a letter is a different experience for each child. But, overall, it is great practice in assembling words, expanding vocabulary, and building sentences. Especially in the summer, it keeps a school-aged child’s reading and writing skills finely tuned and improves penmanship.

 

Sit down with your child and explain the the parts of a letter and how formal or informal (depending on the recipient) to make their note. Help your child practice their sentences and go over what they write. A message can be short and to the point! Teach them where to put the stamp on the envelope.

 

Let your child’s creativity take hold! They will enjoy decorating each letter with stickers, glitter, and lots of colors. Your child can include an illustration, and even decorate the envelope. Make sure to help them address the envelope correctly. You can even talk about the parts of an address as you write it out.

 

Perhaps most importantly, letter writing teaches children the importance and value of patience. In a time when we get things nearly instantaneously, patience is a tremendous virtue best learned at an early age. Let your child drop their letter into the mailbox and wait for a response. The joy of finally getting a letter back addressed to them will make the wait so worth it!

Learning and Dismantling Discriminatory Language

Language is one of the most powerful tools an individual possesses—it is essential in connecting with and learning about each other. However, when language causes harm to certain individuals or communities, it fosters an environment of non-acceptance and discrimination.

 

Despite noticeable efforts to do away with implicit racist language, some people continue to use common terms and phrases without realizing the inherent racism in them. Activists and educators create awareness of such terms and encourage parents to teach children the implicit racist connotations in everyday language. According to Nikki Tennermann, administrative director of the Office of Health Equity and Inclusion at Boston Children’s Hospital, children who hear offensive terms directed at them or their family members develop negative internalized feelings (toward themselves), impacting their identity development.

Mother giving piggyback ride to daughter

Image by shotphoto2u from Vecteezy.com

Below is a list of common American English terms that are normalized in everyday usage, but extremely harmful and insulting to marginalized communities. It’s imperative that we understand the negative impact of these words and their history, especially when inculcating language development in children.

 

  1. Powwow: Considered an offensive appropriation of a culturally important term in Indigenous communities.
  2. Master bedroom: The word “master” has problematic ties with slavery as it implies ownership and existence of “enslaved people’s quarters.”
  3. Blacklist/Blacklisted: Terms that imply Black is bad in comparison to the “whitelist” of accepted terms.
  4. Urban: In references to literature and music, this term reinforces negative stereotypes and marginalizes Black artists.
  5. Thug: Although the Indian origin word “ruffian” means thief, in the US, this term is a nominally “polite” way of using the N-word.
  6. Uppity: According to The Atlantic, this is a term racist Southerners used to describe Black people, especially Black women, who “didn’t know their place.”
  7. Spirit animal: Similar to “powwow,” this term also appropriates Indigenous cultures and puts forth misconceptions about their sacred beliefs.
  8. Long time, no see: Although NPR says this as an accepted form of American slang, some believe it mocks people of Asian descent who speak with broken English.
  9. Tribe: When a non-Indigenous person uses “tribe,” it erases the significance of Tribal sovereignty and identity.
  10. Eskimo: A derogatory term used by colonizers that contains racist connotations of barbarism.

 

Many parents and caregivers now take initiative to speak with their children about racism and discrimination in language. Although these conversations are not easy to navigate, they foster a sense of understanding and empathy in young children. Moreover, they are the first step toward building an anti-racist household.

 

How can I teach my child to identify and deal with racial/ethnic slurs?

Here are some strategies you can use to facilitate a conversation with your preschooler/toddler. To engage with your child at an earlier age, refer to the resources at the end!

 

  1. Address the situation immediately: If your child says something hurtful or disrespectful, be swift and firm in your response. Let them know that it is harmful to the other person or community. Use phrases like “It is not okay to use that term. It is inappropriate and unkind.”
  2. Explain the origin of the word(s): Do not downplay the racism and use age-appropriate descriptions. For instance: “Their feelings are hurt because it is not the right way to describe them.” You can also explain how the term(s) is/are racist and teach your child the appropriate words. “We do not use the word ‘Eskimo. The correct word is Inuit.”
  3. Acknowledge your child’s feelings: If your child is a target of any slur, comfort and acknowledge their feelings. “I know it made you angry when they called you that name. It’s okay to feel angry about that.”
  4. Start an open dialogue: You can also ask questions like “Why do you think they said that?” Reaffirm their identity by saying, “We are proud of our heritage. Even if people say such things, it doesn’t affect who we are.”
  5. Engage in positive media: Read and watch positive portrayals of different communities. To counter negative media stereotypes, expose your child to stories, books, films, etc. that accurately represent diverse racial and ethnic groups. For example, the film Zootopia explores stereotypes among animal groups, which is a great way of teaching children the impact of prejudices and false perceptions.
  6. Understand your own biases: Acknowledge your own implicit bias(es) and make a conscious effort to be a role model for your child. If your child observes you making an effort, they are likely to follow suit. Have regular conversations about racism and bigotry to develop an anti-racist environment.
Father and son reading outside

Image by notecocktail915705 from Vecteezy.com

These are just some of the ways you can teach your child about bias-free language. Consult the following resources for more information on ways to talk to your child about racial bias.